What Can You Give A Dog For Pain?

What can you give a dog for pain?

Pet owners tend to think of their furry friends as just small humans. While this may be tempting in terms of behavior and how much love you feel for your pets, this can be a dangerous attitude since our biology is actually very different in many ways.

Dogs and cats experience pain just like humans. Often, the causes of their pain is the same as humans. Repetitive motion, aging, and trauma are among the causes. So when they do suffer from pain, how do you treat them? What do you give them? Is your selection just “masking” their pain for the short term, or is it attacking the cause to actually provide long term relief. Is it possible that your dog pain relief selection could actually be hurting your pet’s health? Possibly even jeopardizing their life?


Short Term Solution – Pain Relievers

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

These can be extremely dangerous to pets, you should never give any NSAID to your dog or cat without first checking with your veterinarian.

Ibuprofen (Advil)

According to the Pet Poison Helpline, Ibuprofen is toxic to dogs, and is classified as “moderate to severe, life-threatening” Dr. Randall has mentioned many times in the past that Ibuprofen is poisonous to dogs. That is absolutely correct, Ibuprofen is fatal to dogs in large doses and has a very narrow safety window, meaning a small amount is safe, but as you move on to larger amounts, it becomes very harmful quickly. It is best to avoid ever giving your dog Ibuprofen as the risk of doing more harm than good is very high.

Naproxen (Aleve and Midol)

Naproxen is very poisonous to both dogs and cats. According to the Pet poison Helpline, “As little as one 220mg tablet can cause very serious symptoms (even death), even in a large dog.” Technically it does have a small window where it can be used safely, but it is too much of a risk to recommend.

Aspirin

Aspirin can be used safely for dogs, one thing to consider is the blood thinning property. Just as in humans, those with previous medical conditions should use Aspirin with caution if there is a risk associated with thinning of the individual’s blood. Also, if your pet accidentally gets into Aspirin and ingests a large amount that can be very dangerous.

Long Term Solution – Joint Supplements for Dogs

What you give your dog should be based on the type of pain they are having and you should consider whether the choice is a long term or a short term solution. Joint supplements are a great idea if your dog is experiencing joint pain of any kind. Even if your dog is active now, you don’t want to wait until the need relief from joint pain before you start to think about it as part of their diet.

Flexpet is a joint supplement for dogs and cats. It was developed using natural ingredients (not pharmaceuticals) to provide immediate relief as well as rebuild and strengthen connective tissue. The specific and unique combination of ingredients in Flexpet will provide a long term solution for those whose pets are having issues with joint pain or who are looking to prevent those problems in the future.

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1 Month Supply

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$39.95

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3 Month Supply

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$26.63 / Bottle

Total Savings- $39.95
Total Cost- $89.90

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Trial Pack

Flexcin-Flexpet-OTG

$12.00

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7 Day Supply

buy

 

1 Month Supply

flexpet_1

$39.95

Single Bottle
1 Month Supply

buy

3 Month Supply

flexpet_3pk

$26.63 / Bottle

Total Savings- $39.95
Total Cost- $89.90

buy

Trial Pack

Flexcin-Flexpet-OTG

$12.00

Try Flexpet Now!
7 Day Supply

buy

Comments 14

  1. My dog is lying now in the garage not moving and not responding. I have given her 1advil a day for week she is very overweight and 18 yrs old.I think I may have killed my dog instead of trying to make her feel better. She has arthritis so bad In her hind parts .I was trying to help please tell me I haven’t killed her is there anything I can do?

  2. if your pet is in that much pain, you need to pry open your wallet and take it to a vet. you need to weigh your need to keep an animal alive because you’ll miss it or you love it too much. many years ago my mother had a korgy…like the queen of england. she took that lil bugger everywhere. and for many many years they enjoyed each other. i had moved out by then and when i was back in the country, i would visit my mother and JB the dog. i came home one time and saw my mother cleaning up the dogs crap, off the couch she shared with JB. i found out that for the last four or five months JB could no longer walk, or even crawl. she was hand feeding the poor thing and when nature called poor JB just went where she was laying. I asked my mother if she loved JB, and of course she affirmed she did. I asked her if she would want to live like that, not being able to move…feed yourself…or even go to the bathroom? well of course not, she said and then clued into my train of thought. ….it is your responsibility Jean to give your pet the best life you can…and that includes a peaceful death if it’s in so much pain it can’t even move anymore.
    it’ll be hard, but your pet needs you to love it that much
    good luck Jean

  3. These articles are mostly useless. For every DO in one article, I can find a DON’T in some other article. This article, like most, spends most of its time telling us what we cannot do even though the article (and typically so) is entitled “What can you give a dog for pain.”, not ‘What can you not give …”.

    It seems no one really knows. Perhaps the market for dog pain relief is just not large enough to attract an investment by drug companies. Perhaps everyone is just trying to cover their butts. In any case there are very few good answers.

    1. Actually, a good part of the article was talking about how Aspirin is okay in limited amounts and the proper dosage, Dr. Randall specified the same in the video and talked about previcox, and probably half of the article talked about how Flexpet is a good, safe option for dogs with joint pain. There are drugs on the market as well (like Tramadol). A lot of what you’re looking for is going to depend whether or not you are looking for something in the traditional “drug/medication/pharma” market, or if you’re looking for more natural alternatives.

      Is there something specific you were looking for?

    2. Thank you for saying that. These articles are annoying at best…and seem to be written by people who to hear themselves talk. Okay fine…say, “DO NOT give your dog xyz…they are toxic!” That’s it!…don’t go on and on. Then give some good advice to help people deal with their pets pain.

  4. I want to start off saying i am deeply sorry for your lose. But at that age of what your dog was, it most likely past away by natural causes associated with old age. To have a dog that old shows how good of a dog parent you are and there is no shame in that, you were only trying to do your best and your dogs passing just ended up happening at a specific time that aligned with the medication that you gave. Unless you fed your dog half the bottle of pills that day then I would be almost positive.

  5. My 179 ppund Great Dane was racing around the house this afternoon doing what we call his “happy dance”, and he seems to have strained or sprained something in his leg. It’s not so bad that he can’t walk or put weight on it, but it is definitely sore to the point that he yelps when he first gets up after laying down for some time. I would like to know what otc medication would be safe to give hime for some pain relief. I certainly don’t want to give him anything that would hurt him. Some articles say yes to ibuprofen, tylenol, & aspirin in limited quantities, then others say no. What is ok to give? Thanks,

    1. Please check with your vet before giving your dog any supplements or medication. While we cannot prescribe or recommend medication, Dr. Randal (the vet we talked to in the video above) very strongly recommends never giving your pet Advil (ibuprofen) or Tylenol, as it can be very damaging do your dogs liver. We have extensive information on Aspirin for dogs here: https://flexpet.com/aspirin-for-dogs-what-you-need-to-know/ (ultimately, Dr. Randall said it’s okay, but for very short term usage). For longer term joint pain and issues, we recommend a natural supplement like Flexpet that has no side effects or long term damage to organs like the liver after extensive use.

      Hope that helps!

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